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The superfluous anarchist: Albert Jay Nock. by Michael Wreszin

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Published by Brown University Press in Providence .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Nock, Albert Jay, 1872 or 3-1945

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 179-188.

Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS3527.O2 Z9 1972
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 196 p.
Number of Pages196
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5221740M
ISBN 100870571303
LC Control Number75154339
OCLC/WorldCa247292

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Superfluous anarchist: Albert Jay Nock. Providence, Brown University Press [, ©] (OCoLC) Named Person: Albert Jay Nock; Albert Jay Nock: Material Type: Biography: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Michael . This is a book of ideas that loosely relate to the life of Albert Jay Nock, a libertarian writer, man of letters and prophet of doom. A fairly private man, his memoirs were pretty barebones. He doesn't say anything about his wife and children, nor does he mention his time as an Episcopal priest/5. The superfluous anarchist: Albert Jay Nock Item Preview remove-circle Nock, Albert Jay, or , Authors, American, Educators Publisher Providence: Brown University Press Collection Borrow this book to access EPUB and PDF files. IN COLLECTIONS. Books to : Albert Jay Nock (Octo –Aug ) was an influential American libertarian author, educational theorist, and social critic of the early and middle twentieth century. Murray Rothbard was deeply influenced by him, and so was the whole generation of free market thinkers of the s.

The self-proclaimed 'philosophical anarchist,' Albert Jay Nock, thought he was so superfluous to the society around him that he titled his autobiography, Memoirs of a Superfluous Man. He felt utterly out of step with the twentieth century. Born in , he witnessed the severe societal changes resulting from world wars, revolutions in ideology, and the consequences of political measures. The self-proclaimed 'philosophical anarchist' Albert Jay Nock thought he was so superfluous to the society around him that his autobiography is entitled Memoirs of a Superfluous Man (). He felt utterly out of step with the Twentieth Century. Born in the early s, he witnessed the severe societal changes resulting from world wars, revolutions in ideology and the spinning-out of political. The superfluous anarchist: Albert Jay Nock. Providence: Brown University Press. MLA Citation. Wreszin, Michael,. The superfluous anarchist: Albert Jay Nock Brown University Press Providence Australian/Harvard Citation. Wreszin, Michael,. , The superfluous anarchist: Albert Jay Nock Brown University Press Providence. Wikipedia Citation.   Memoirs of a Superfluous Man (Albert Jay Nock) written by Charles. Many years ago, I belonged to a debating society, which, among other activities, sponsored formal dinners at which there was much drinking and then singing, from an official songbook of thoroughly not-politically correct songs. which is a type of anarchist cookbook, an entry.

  The self-proclaimed “philosophical anarchist,” Albert Jay Nock, thought he was so superfluous to the society around him that he titled his autobiography, Memoirs of a Superfluous Man. He felt utterly out of step with the twentieth century. (Nock is best known for his pivotal and highly recommended book Our Enemy, The State. For an earlier generation of American dissidents from the prevailing ideology of left-liberalism, a rite of passage was reading Albert Jay Nock's Memoirs of a Superfluous Man, which appeared in William F. Buckley was hardly alone in seeing it as a seminal text crucial to his personal formation.   I n , Albert Jay Nock, then forty, joined the American Magazine. His writings, unusually good, were his best credential. Otherwise, no one knew much about him. Writing about Thomas Jefferson years later, he would characterize him as “the most approachable and the most impenetrable of men, easy and delightful of acquaintance, impossible of knowledge.   Albert Jay Nock was one of the most thoroughgoing critics of using “political means” to achieve social ends in the American literary tradition. Libertarians have embraced Nock’s often virulent antistatism, but his possession of the traits he ascribed to Jefferson—“radical principles and ideals combined with Tory manners”—have made.